San Francisco Attorney Elected to State Bar Board of Trustees

Contact: Laura Ernde 

415-538-2283

laura.ernde@calbar.ca.gov

SAN FRANCISCO, July 11, 2013 – Attorney Daniel Dean of San Francisco was elected today to serve a three-year term on the State Bar Board of Trustees.

Dean, 47, was elected by attorneys in District 1, which covers Alameda, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Solano, and Sonoma counties. Dean is a civil trial attorney with Fotouhi Epps Hillger Gilroy Mau PC in San Francisco, representing both plaintiffs and defendants in personal injury, employment, medical malpractice, construction defect, business litigation and other matters.

Dean has served with a number of community and legal groups including as a board member and co-chairman of the Bay Area Lawyers for Individual Freedom, as co-chairman of the Minority Bar Coalition, and as a board member of the Bar Association of San Francisco. He is currently on the board of his alma mater, the University of San Francisco School of Law, and serves as a judge pro tem with San Francisco County Superior Court in its traffic and small claims departments.

Turnout for the election was 9.6 percent of those attorneys eligible to cast votes. About 56 percent of the votes were cast by mail and the rest came in electronically. Dean received 69 percent of the vote against competitor Omid E. Talai, 32, an assistant district attorney with the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office.

District 1 was one of two seats up for election on the Board of Trustees this year. In April, Joanna Mendoza, 49, of Granite Bay, was deemed elected after she was the only attorney to file to run in District 3, representing 23 counties in Northern California.

The Board of Trustees is the governing and policymaking body of the 243,000-member organization. Dean and Mendoza will be sworn in at the State Bar Annual Meeting in October.

###

The State Bar of California is an administrative arm of the California Supreme Court, serving the public and seeking to improve the justice system for more than 80 years. All lawyers practicing law in California must be members of the State Bar. By July 2013, membership reached 243,000.